Transgender Day of Remembrance Memorializes Those Who Died As a Result of Transphobic Violence

Blossom Brown served as MC for the event

This year’s Transgender Day of Remembrance proved to be a somber yet uplifting event. Held Friday night on Zoom, the event featured the Reading of Names of people who have died as a result of transphobic violence.

“We are here to honor their memory and celebrate their lives,” said Blossom Brown who served as the master of ceremonies for the event. “For me as a trans woman of color, as a black trans women, this event is very personal.”

In her welcome, West Hollywood Mayor Lindsey Horvath reported more than 350 people have died around the globe in the past year due to transphobic violence, at least 37 of those people in the United States.

“This is an atrocity,” said Horvath. “We recommit ourselves to ending transphobia, violence and discrimination against transgender and gender nonconforming individuals. We dedicate ourselves to uplifting, empowering and celebrating the transgender community here with us, so someday we don’t have to have this event.”

Alexis Sanchez, the vice chair of West Hollywood’s Transgender Advisory Board, called upon cisgender allies to help “increase access to safe and affordable housing, to good paying jobs, to supportive services and all the things that help protect our community.”

Transgender Advisory Board chair Jake Rostovsky issued a call to action to all participating in the event, saying, “This is an opportunity for the city’s advisory board to influence legislation, educate, sensitize politician and inspire allies to engage in solidarity. The fight continues every single day.”

During the Reading of Names, speakers read a murdered person’s name aloud and offered a quick bit of information about the person’s life and how the person died, followed by saying, “We will always remember you,” while a photo of the person being memorialized displayed on screen.

At the conclusion of the Reading of Names, the speakers said repeatedly in unison, “We will always remember you. We will always remember you. We will always remember you.”

The evening also featured transgender poet Jaden Fields reading an untitled poem about the transgender experience, followed by singer Angel Bonilla performing her song, “Good Enough.”

First established in 1999, the Transgender Day of Remembrance has become an international event that not only memorializes those who have been murdered as a result of transphobia, but also draws attention to the continued violence endured by transgender people.

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Jay
Jay
11 days ago

No one should have to live in fear of violence, especially for simply being who they are.

Bravo to West Hollywood for shining its spotlight on this tragically ongoing and increasing issue!

Ham Shipey
Ham Shipey
12 days ago

the site needs to identify what it is. this is not a site for residents of WH. it’s focused on a certain community…..which is fine if you make it clear to all.

Know your city
Know your city
12 days ago
Reply to  Ham Shipey

Your posts suggest that you don’t understand the history of the city and that you also don’t support reporting about city events that don’t interest you personally. You always have the option to ignore articles that don’t interest you yet you should also realize you’ve chosen to live in a community that proudly and very openly supports the LGBTQ community. A little research on the city’s history may help: “The City of West Hollywood is like no other city in the world. In 1984, the idea for the City of West Hollywood was proposed by an unlikely coalition of LGBT… Read more »

Ham Shipey
Ham Shipey
11 days ago
Reply to  Know your city

the city council does not reflect the majority of residents. most residents today are professionals and living here for it’s centralized location. live your life as you wish…..but don’t assume residents here are monolithic and support your views.

Know your city
Know your city
11 days ago
Reply to  Ham Shipey

Support of the LGBTQ community is not just the city council. It’s part of why and how the city was incorporated. The majority of residents know and respect that. Many move here for that very reason.

You, apparently, did not research the city’s history or structure prior to moving here. I’m not sure how you missed the rainbow and trans flags, memorials, celebrations and annual Pride events as part of your decision to live here.

Also, professionals are not a monolith. Many support the city’s history and respect LGBTQ rights. In fact, many professionals are LGBTQ.

Jay
Jay
10 days ago
Reply to  Know your city

Well said, Know your city!

allan
allan
12 days ago

The trans activists and media have co-opted trans murder as transphobic, which is not true. According the Global Humanity Alliance, 80% of murders are from domestic violence, not random hate crimes.

Facts matter

Orly
Orly
12 days ago

I am sorry that at 2020 some people are still narrow minded .I believe in live and let live .

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