Data Map Shows WeHo’s COVID-19 Rate Is Lower Than That of Communities to the South

Crosstown LA (xtown.la) COVID-19 infection map

West Hollywood now has 172 confirmed COVID-19 infections, an increase of two from the 170 reported yesterday by the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health.

The Los Angeles County Health Department today reported 1,047new infections, bringing that to a total of 46,018 confirmed cases of COVID-19 across the county. There have been 12 new deaths, bringing that 2,116.

The Health Department’s COVID-19 dashboard today reports that2,801 West Hollywood residents have been tested for the virus. The previously published count was 2,391. Four West Hollywood residents have died of COVID-19-related infections.

As of today, the number of confirmed infections in Beverly Hills grew by two to 130. The number of infections in Culver City has increased by one to 137. The number of infections in the Hollywood neighborhood has increased by three to 253. The number of confirmed infections in the Melrose neighborhood increased by eight to a total of 517.

The map published above presents a visual comparison of West Hollywood’s infection rate with that of other Westside cities. Those cities or communities that are dark red have had the highest percentage of infections.  West Hollywood’s rate is 473.02 per 100,000 persons. The Fairfax district has a much higher rate of confirmed infections, with 3,744.48 per 100,000 residents.  The Carthay neighborhood to the south of West Hollywood also has a high rate, with 2,034.4 infections per 100,000 people.

The rate in Beverly Hills is 378.02 per 100,000, and Santa Monica has 276.01 infections per 100,000.

The data presented by Crosstown LA differs slightly from that of the county Health Department. Crosstown LA uses population data from the 2018 American Community Survey to calculate rate of infection per 100,000 residents. And for the City of Los Angeles, it uses a library of neighborhood boundaries developed by the Los Angeles Times (which explains why there is no Melrose neighborhood). “In several cases, we modified the neighborhood definitions provided by the Department of Public Health to conform to our boundaries,” Crosstown LA explains. “In several cases, we aggregated smaller areas into larger ones to conform with our boundaries. The revised boundaries may result in totals that, in some cases, vary slightly from numbers published by the county.”

Crosstown LA is a data-based reporting service that is based out of the USC Annenberg School for Journalism, and partnered with the Integrated Media Systems Center at the Viterbi School of Engineering. Its team also includes faculty and researchers from the Spatial Sciences Institute.

As of Friday, the City of West Hollywood began requiring that all people wear face coverings in public. The requirement has drawn criticism from some residents who have argued that face coverings have no impact on transmission of the virus, which is not true. Such coverings have been determined to reduce the likelihood that an infected person can transmit the COVID-19 virus through the air by coughing or sneezing or even talking. Some people who are infected may be unaware of it and not showing symptoms at first.

The best protection against COVID-19 continues to be to wash your hands frequently, avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands, self-isolate if you are sick, practice physical distancing (especially by staying at home) and wear a clean face covering when in contact with others from outside your household.

The Health Department states that “People who have underlying health conditions remain at much greater risk for serious illness from COVID-19, so it will continue to be very important for the county’s vulnerable residents to stay at home as much as possible, to have groceries and medicine delivered, and to call their providers immediately if they have even mild symptoms.”

Residents with questions about the COVID-19 pandemic and who are looking for resources to deal with it can find answers on the City of West Hollywood’s  website.  Here is a list of links to sections about particular subjects and issues:

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Vigilant
Vigilant
3 months ago

The headline here appears misleading. While factually correct, we have more cases than Beverly Hills and Culver City but less that Melrose which is distinctly on our border. That is concerning because if WH gets careless they are close enough and may migrate here while we relax protocols. One never knows the travel patterns of bone heads. Although any community is concerning, the ones to the south may be less so. I have no crystal ball other than to be vigilant.

Henry (Hank) Scott
Admin
3 months ago
Reply to  Vigilant

The word “rate” is used in this case to mean the number per 100,000 residents. It is not meant to be interpreted as “number”

Vigilant
Vigilant
3 months ago

Thank you. Where does it illustrate that in the reports?

Henry (Hank) Scott
Admin
3 months ago
Reply to  Vigilant

There is no indication of it in the story, given that most people understand “rate” to mean “a measure, quantity, or frequency, typically one measured against some other quantity or measure,” as in number of infections per 100,000 people and “number” to be an arithmetical value, expressed by a word, symbol, or figure, representing a particular quantity, as in the exact number of infections.

Michael Grace
Michael Grace
3 months ago

California, when it comes to COVID-19 death rates in the United States as of May 25, 2020, by states is in the bottom half. While New York has 150 deaths per 100,000 population California has 10 deaths. Other under 10 deaths per 100,000 include Florida, Texas, Oregon, Tennessee, North & South Carolina, Kansas. The top five COVID-19 deathtrap states are NY, NJ, Conn, and Mass plus D.C. Although the political heads in New York, Gov. Cuomo, and Gov. De Blasio, have been covered in the media like the second coming, with news and Democrat Party talking heads feeling the governor… Read more »