West Hollywood Ranks High When It Comes to Collisions of Cars With Pedestrians

A pedestrian hit by a car at Santa Monica Boulevard at Martel in May 2019 s taken into an ambulance (Photo by Jim Garrecht / ANG News)

If you needed more evidence that you should take your eyes off your mobile phone and look both ways when crossing the street, consider that a recent report says West Hollywood ranked

No. 9 in pedestrian accidents among all 88 cities in Los Angeles County in 2018. Perhaps more disturbing, WeHo ranked No. 1 in pedestrian accidents per number of residents.

The report, prepared by Pollard Bailey, a personal injury law firm, is based on data from the California Highway Patrol’s Statewide Integrated Traffic Records System.

In 2018, West Hollywood experienced 60 car crashes involving pedestrians, with 57 of them including injuries to pedestrians and one resulting in the death of a pedestrian.

Los Angeles, the largest city in L.A. County with over 3.7 million residents, ranked No. 1, with 3,340 pedestrian crashes and 3,301 pedestrian injuries. Of those, 131 died. Los Angeles ranked No. 3 in the number of pedestrian accidents per resident.

According to the report, pedestrian crashes are more likely to happen early in the day and later in the afternoon.

“From 7 a.m. to 9 a.m. is the first spike in pedestrian injuries, where everyone is presumably heading to work, dropping off their children to school, and starting their day,” the report says. “The sudden spike in pedestrian activity (and therefore injuries) is dramatic: the time block from 7 a.m. to 8 a.m. shows a significant 114% increase in pedestrian injuries from the previous hour.

“The second spike occurs during the later rush hour period. Occurring from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m., this is the period with the highest number of crashes resulting in pedestrian injuries – the only hour periods where pedestrian injuries exceed 400 each hour. 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. is where pedestrian injuries were highest in 2018, with 450 pedestrian injuries.”

“From 9 p.m. on, the number of pedestrian injuries follows a downward trend, until it hits the lowest point from 3 to 4 a.m.

Map created by Pollard Bailey.

The Pollard Bailey report says the spike in pedestrian accidents between 3 and 4 p.m. – there were 386 – may reflect the fact that that is the time when most schools let out. “This leads to more foot traffic near school zones, greater congestion from parents picking up their children, and added potential for distracted driving.”

The report suggests that the spike in pedestrian fatalities from 8 to 10 p.m. “could be attributed to additional foot and vehicle traffic as people go out and enjoy the nightlife.”

Also worthy of note, the report says, is that “ a majority of pedestrian accidents in L.A. County didn’t occur at intersections: only 2,267 crashes occurred at or in the proximity of an intersection, such as a crosswalk – roughly 39% of all pedestrian crashes in the county for 2018.

“While this percentage remained roughly the same in pedestrian injuries, the difference in pedestrian fatalities between intersection and non-intersection collisions was significant: 52 fatalities vs 201 fatalities, respectively. This is likely due to general safety precautions at intersections to prevent such serious accidents. At non-intersections, there is a greater likelihood of unexpected things happening, such as pedestrians darting out into the sidewalk – which can lead to serious fatal consequences.”

0 0 vote
Article Rating

16 Comments
Newest
Oldest
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Joshua88
Joshua88
10 months ago

This is a remarkable statistic.
Someday in the future, there will be no cars – and little pollution.

DD Donelly
DD Donelly
10 months ago

Jaywalkers should be fined. There are adequate crosswalks in WEHO to offer safe crossing.
I am infuriated when I see people standing on the median which is a risk to them and further a traffic disruption.

Awesome Weho
Awesome Weho
10 months ago

We’re only #1 in pedestrian accidents per resident because so many pedestrians don’t live here. And many of them are drunk while jaywalking.

radii314
radii314
10 months ago

The crosswalks need BRIGHT LIGHTS to shine across the pathway from above once a button is pushed – current systems not enough – being West Hollywood there could even be disco balls

Trevor W. Frith
Trevor W. Frith
10 months ago

Could not stop in time. 19 pedestrians and cyclists will die today and every day in car-pedestrian/cyclist crashes mostly because of the flaws and inefficiencies of the right foot braking method which we are all forced to use when braking an electric or automatic vehicle, (poor reaction time and stopping distance – If this driver could have applied the brakes ¾ of a second sooner and stopped 40 – 60 feet shorter, would there have been a crash?) There is no scientific justification for the right foot braking method other than ’that’s the way it’s always been taught’! NHTSA and… Read more »

carleton cronin
10 months ago

As far back in time as 1951, at military police training sessions on high performance driving (high speeds, etc.), braking with the left foot, even with necessary use of the clutch, was required. I used that technique throughout my days of driving. My wife learned it when she raced stock cars in Colorado.

Josh Kurpies
Josh Kurpies
10 months ago

“At non-intersections, there is a greater likelihood of unexpected things happening, such as pedestrians darting out into the sidewalk – which can lead to serious fatal consequences” This sentence from the report is an example of the bias against bikers/pedestrians and in favor of the automobile experienced by bikers/peds everyday in the media and policy. It’s fascinating to me the report uses an example that would appear to put the pedestrian at blame for their own death when in fact we know that most collisions are caused by unsafe driving speed or distracted driving – both failures of the driver.… Read more »

Awesome Weho
Awesome Weho
10 months ago
Reply to  Josh Kurpies

Haha, you mean bias against jaywalkers. California has comparative negligence laws, meaning if a person walks out into the street from between cars or mid-block and gets hit, and the driver wasn’t speeding, under the influence, or distracted, then the injured person’s damages will be reduced by the percentage the jury finds it was their fault. Being on foot doesn’t relieve you of all responsibilty.

Josh Kurpies
Josh Kurpies
10 months ago
Reply to  Awesome Weho
John
John
10 months ago

It’s simple, we have WAY too much traffic running through neighborhoods and the city in general. More should be done to curb rush hour traffic on Fountain and Sunset during certain hours.

Gregory
Gregory
10 months ago

What as Weho residents can we do?
Melrose is a speedway. No speed limit signs at San Vicente. Sheriff does not post a cruiser therr to monitor. It is a daily scare.

David
David
10 months ago

We’re #1! By a long shot.

Cooper
Cooper
10 months ago

EVERY day, I see pedestrians just hop off the curb without looking first. If you don’t make eye contact with the driver, you’re risking your life. There’s a sense of complacency and entitlement with pedestrians here. Sure drivers should stop, but you’re risking your life assuming they see you. If your phone is more important than your life, then keep looking down and natural selection is going to take care of the rest. It’s much safer for a pedestrian to make sure they’re safe to cross than hoping 5000 pounds of steel traveling 30mph is going to see you and… Read more »

WeHo Resident
WeHo Resident
10 months ago

I am not surprised at all. WeHo, for all of it’s pride in being the city with the highest Walkscore in California, has consistently prioritized cars in its transportation planning over bikes and pedestrians. It took the City so many years to address the dangerous crosswalk situation. The City should lower the speed limit on SMB from 35 to 25, take away a lane from cars to become a bike and scooter lane, and create a dedicated busway. this will make all those angry drivers who speed through our city from LA to Beverly Hills/Santa Monica avoid the area and… Read more »

The Real Zam
10 months ago

While these numbers are bad, and should be improved, I still think the particular dynamics of our city skew these numbers to our disadvantage. The city is extremely walkable and many take advantage of this. Almost the entire city is walkable while others have large areas which are poorly suited for pedestrian use. We have many major thoroughfares which pass through our city which leads to a lot of traffic driving through, but not stopping in, our town. Many of these drivers are also not accustomed to driving in pedestrian-heavy urban zones and / or not even aware that this… Read more »