WeHo’s ‘Movietown Square’ Opens Its Doors Thursday to Senior Residents

One of the community rooms at Movietown Square.
One of the community rooms at Movietown Square.
0 0 vote
Article Rating

18 Comments
Newest
Oldest
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Robert
Robert
3 years ago

I like that the city is helping provide housing for low income seniors, but I think it would also benefit the city to build more low to moderate income housing for young people who are employed locally but can’t afford rent here. It would help to keep a mix of different ages. Helping people who are starting out is an investment in the future.

Jen
Jen
3 years ago

Income limits are determined by the Area Median Income (AMI), a number based on all incomes, and calculated annually by HUD. The AMI is the “middle” number of all of the incomes for the given area; 50% of people in that area make more than that amount, and 50% make less than that amount. The income levels are percentages of that AMI number: any household income at or below 80% of the AMI is considered “low-income”; above 80% and up to 120% of the median income is considered “moderate- income.” Above this is “middle-income.” At Movietown; 10% of the units… Read more »

SaveWeho
SaveWeho
3 years ago

@Steve Martin: What is the breakdown of those 77 units between the Low Income and Moderate Income levels? From what I understand…Weho has consolidated Very Low Income and Low Income into one level. I haven’t seen any developments looking solely for “Moderate Income” levels either.

Steve Martin
Steve Martin
3 years ago

Manny has it right; we need developers to build affordable housing on site rather than pay the “in lieu fee”. It will result in more units being built while creating less of an incentive to demolish rent controlled buildings. What is really crucial is the number of very low income units in Avalon. The system we have breaks units down to very low, low and moderate units. The developers want as many moderate as possible but these units are very often out of reach for the very low income people who need the help the most. There is a shortage… Read more »

SE
SE
3 years ago

I’m curious if a senior or disabled person who lives in a rent-stabilized apartment qualifies for any of these new units? It would seem to undermine creating affordable housing, as each vacated rent-stabilized unit would then be raised to market value. I would hope that local residents on fixed incomes due to age or disability who are facing eviction due to the Ellis Act are at the top of the list; otherwise, I think the others need to stay put.

Bwaaaaaaaaaaa!
Bwaaaaaaaaaaa!
3 years ago

@’John: Hit the nail on the head!

SaveWeho
SaveWeho
3 years ago

@John. Such a hateful response and putting a blanket stereotype on all kinds of people. Your comments might have some validity if wages had increased with the cost of living anywhere in SoCal. But it hasn’t and people can’t live here. A once affordable studio apartment in a crappy building that ran for $700 15 years ago is now around $1800. Just telling disabled Americans or those not as fortunate as you to “go out and get a job” show’s how uninformed you are on seniors, people living and struggling with various disabilities or veterans. You’re free to express your… Read more »

John
John
3 years ago

I never understand the thinking of some of these people. “I haven’t had a job in my entire adult life. Now I’m 62. When do I get my free brand new luxury-style apartment paid for by working people?” Do you notice how you never hear people say, “I was born in Mexico and pulled out of school in third grade. I’m educationally disabled. Where’s my free apartment?” or “I have an IQ of 82, so I’m below average and I want to be recognized as disabled. Where my free apartment?” or “I grew up in Baldwin Hills. I’m disabled from… Read more »

Manny
Manny
3 years ago

77 units!…..of REAL sustainable affordable housing. If you ever wonder were “in lieu” fees go, here it is.

Another great project by the WHCHC.

SaveWeho
SaveWeho
3 years ago

Unbelievable that even before the list was reopened in July 2013 (for a month) there were already 2,000 people on the waiting list. It truly could be a 10 year+ wait for someone.

Elaine
Elaine
3 years ago

I am 65 year old woman, a disabled vet, and have lived in We Ho for 33 years. I have never been able to get on the low income inclusionary list. I know I am not the only one in this situation. What about us?

18
0
Would love your thoughts, please comment.x
()
x