New York Times Looks at Evolution of Sunset Strip

sunset strip“A jumble of beeping concrete trucks, towering blue and yellow cranes and steel building skeletons rising against the Hollywood Hills.” That’s how The New York Times’ Adam Nagourney describes what is going on today on West Hollywood’s Sunset Strip, where iconic nightclubs (and less esteemed places) are being replaced by 1.1 million square feet of new hotel rooms, condominiums, restaurants and stores. The story is worth a read.


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Chris Sanger
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Chris Sanger

Despite the sense some tend to convey, life evolves. In its 90 years of existence, the Strip was 1st) lined with speakeasies able to operate because this was unincorporated LA Co, and the LACSD was easier to deal with than the LAPD 2nd) a high-end nightclub district catering to top industry figures (plus the most high-end brothel in town – the building, quite nice, still operates differently just west of the Andaz 3rd) a center for younger oriented music entertainment 4th) more recently changing into a hotel/broader tourist destination or at least starting point Nothing untoward or corrupt about this.… Read more »

Tom Smart
Guest
Tom Smart

The largest Cheesecake Factory is called City Hall.

fine7760
Guest

I can’t recall any famous night clubs on the strip being replaced except the tacky HOB which has been a godsend since it closed

Disco Dan
Guest
Disco Dan

Don – Members of the City Council are paid but only a truly modest compensation which I do not believe exceeds $1,000 per month.

Don Azars
Guest
Don Azars

From the statements of employed members of our City Government, it’s obvious that concerns about residents has bowed to the encouragement of glut oriented billboards, new hotels and yet to come, more over-development of the Sunset Strip. I have visions of similar congested streets of Japan as I read the article. This attitude and activity will bleed south to Santa Monica Blvd (it already has more mixed use projects in development) and that will affect the surrounding residential streets, houses and apartments. Progress marches on which is understandable and welcomed but the quality of life is being ignored if not… Read more »