A Devout Carnivore Goes Vegan For a Day at Crossroads

Crossroads dining room
Crossroads dining room.

Behind enemy lines at the new Crossroads restaurant on Melrose, this devout meat-eater and vegan virgin is faced with a challenge: can I survive an upscale, multi-course vegan meal or maybe even enjoy it?

Why haven’t you tried vegan before, you ask? Aren’t you a restaurant critic and a “foodie”? In my defense, I have never considered vegan a cuisine. I’ve considered it a diet at best, or at my most cynical, a means for the high-maintenance diner among us to receive the deference they crave. So, I’ve avoided it admirably. That was, until my editor suggested I check out Crossroads on Melrose and Sweetzer avenues.

“I will never forgive you for this assignment,” I informed him crisply.

The night before my Saturday night reservation, I actually had a nightmare.

“Silly,” I chided my bleary-eyed reflection in the bathroom mirror as I splashed cold water on my face. “They’re just vegetables … lots and lots of vegetables. How bad could they be?”

Flashback to childhood: I’m not allowed to leave the table without eating my veggies. Even my dog won’t touch the once-canned, water-logged “morsels” proffered slyly from under my chair. So into my jeans pockets they go until I’m excused from the table with squishy pants.

But I’m all grown up now, and I know there’s no Jolly Green Giant haunting the kitchen of Crossroads – far from it. Arguably the most celebrated vegan chef in the country, Tal Ronnen, who has cooked for the likes of Oprah, the U.S. Senate and Ellen DeGeneres, is at the helm of this place: the first upscale, “plant-based” dining experience in the West Hollywood area.

“You’re in good hands,” I console myself. I cross the threshold into the restaurant in a cold sweat. As I do, two things strike me: first, the place is packed, and second, the dining room is unexpectedly stunning.

This is no patchouli-scented Haight-Ashbury café with creaky floorboards underfoot and a cold case full of tofurkey sliders humming in the corner. No, I’m standing beneath rows of industrial chandeliers with exposed wires that throw soft light upon cream-colored walls, warm wood and glass.

Crossroads
Sunset and Vine (Photo by Peter Glawatz)

I’m shown to my table and I peruse the drink menu. Yes, there is a full bar. This I knew, but I didn’t expect the drinks to be so creative and delicious. Created by mixologist Gaston Martinez and executed by Jeremy Lake (former bar director of Rivera and Playa), the Crossroads “farm-to-bar” cocktail concept blends herbaceous, sweet and savory notes into potable works of art.

All drinks run about $15. The “Sunset and Vine” is made with Milagro reposado, Solerno, Lillet Rouge, St. Germaine, rhubarb bitters, blood orange, beet, basil and ginger beer. Another favorite was the “Caprese Smash” made with ORO pisco, rhubarb liqueur, Sriracha bitters, balsamic reduction, raspberry, cipollini onion, basil and Roma tomato.

Crossroads
Lentil Flatbread with three seasonal sauces. (Photo by Peter Glawatz)

Impressed and pliant from the tasty drinks, I dig into the first of the small plates with little hesitation. The Lentil Flatbread with Three Seasonal Spreads ($5) tonight features smoked white bean hummus, leek pate and tomato basil banana pepper fondue. The lentil bread tastes slightly wooden, but the three sauces are distinctive and flavorful.

Next to arrive is the Kale Spanakopita ($8) with harissa-spiced smoked tomato fondue and mint oil. My eyes widen in surprise and delight. They are crisp, hot and delicious. The ramekin of tomato dip is wiped clean by the last bite.

The Risotto Stuffed Banana Pepper ($8) comes with a basil and lime beurre blanc. I have no idea what the “beurre” is made out of, but whatever it is, it’s working. The pepper is mild, the risotto creamy and the citrus note in the blanket of silky sauce throws the whole thing into high gear.

All of a sudden, I’m having fun. Some of the more substantial dishes arrive and I wonder if the momentum can possibly continue with the entrees. It does.

Crossroads
Wood-fired meaty lasagna. (Photo by Peter Glawatz)

The Wood-Fired Meaty Lasagna ($14) is made from house-made noodles, tofu ricotta, soy mozzarella, marinara sauce and homemade gardein, which I learned is some kind of protein substitute that can be made from a variety of plant-based foods, none of which my server was at liberty to elaborate on. Yes, it sounds horrific, but this imposter was indistinguishable from the gloppy variety of real lasagna.

My favorite dish though may have been the Biscuits and Morel Mushroom Gravy ($14). How one can make a biscuit without eggs is fascinating, but above that, the creamy gravy was a great stage to showcase the prized morel mushroom in all its glory at the height of its season.

I left Crossroads a changed man. I am still amazed by Chef Ronnan’s skill and intelligence in manipulating things that sprout from the earth into delicate and edible expressions of creativity.

Will I be giving up meat? Not on your life, but for vegans and the curious alike, Crossroads delivers more than unique and memorable food and drink; it may just bring you enlightenment.

8284 Melrose Ave. at Sweetzer, Los Angeles
(323) 782-9245

0 0 vote
Article Rating

9 Comments
Newest
Oldest
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Heather
Heather
7 years ago

Kenneth I wasn’t criticising or ridiculing the vegan lifestyle, just saying I don’t get it. What are you trying to prove by posting pics of animal suffering on Facebook? We all know it happens. But it is not one sided, what vegetarians always conveniently ignore is the huge amount of animal suffering and death caused by modern agriculture methods as well. Vast areas of land are raped of their natural Bioecology, pesticides, herbicides, agricultural run-off into water courses and oceans, they all result in death and suffering. We are all guilty, not because any of us WANT to condone animal… Read more »

Kenneth Simon (@ksimon)

Heather, your comment is the perfect example of what is maddening about any discussions of vegans, vegetarians, omnivores and the rest. Vegans are ridiculed in the media almost constantly, insulted by some self-defined “foodies,” and bombarded with unsolicited commentary about why their dietary choice is wrong. Meanwhile, a noisy minority of vegans are equally obnoxious (“I’m going to post pictures of suffering animals on Facebook — that will convince everyone!”). The quiet majority of folks probably just want to eat what they want to eat and get on with life. I think it’s weird that some people are so defensive… Read more »

Heather
Heather
7 years ago

Well done James. Now it’s the turn of a vegan to enjoy a meal at a good restaurant serving meat. That’s the difference. We can eat their food, (and there is no reason in the world why it shouldn’t be delicious, food is food, whatever goes into it) but they wont, or can’t eat ours. I just don’t get this vegan lifestyle thing. Humans are omnivores, period. Enjoy ALL the things that the good lord has created in the world. Who are we to to have the arrogance to be selective about it. We are what we are, and denial… Read more »

Lynn Russell
Lynn Russell
7 years ago

Excellent reporting in every respect. Can’t wait to eat there.

Rebecca S.
Rebecca S.
7 years ago

I have been to Crossroads and I think this chef should be nominated for a James Beard award. And so should this writer. Great stuff!

Melanie
Melanie
7 years ago

I really enjoyed reading this report. I wouldn’t want to eat much from the menu, although the description of biscuits and morel gravy had me nearly drooling. What a delightful story of low expectations being vastly exceeded.

Jordan
Jordan
7 years ago

@Marco, totally agree! He is very informative and entertaining! Since when does a food review let you share a laugh with your six year old.

Mains
Mains
7 years ago

Makes me want to eat there. Great review! Keep ’em coming.

marco colantonio
marco colantonio
7 years ago

I’ve worked with Anthony Bourdain, owned and operated restaurants in NYC and SF and this guy James Tipper is one of the best food writers I have encountered in 20 years. He is knowledgeable, perceptive and his writing is concise, descriptive and clearly demonstrates that he is food savvy.