BY THE NUMBERS: WeHo Population, Housing, Poverty and More

Community Study Graphic
Graphic by Jason Frankin

Despite what many residents may think, population, number of households and average household size have each decreased in West Hollywood since 2000, according to preliminary “community study” numbers released Monday by the city.

For the last few months, the city has held workshops, focus groups and interviews and sent out surveys in an effort to update the demographics and determine how it should prioritize social services.

The result of that work is the “2013 West Hollywood Community Study,” which will be fully released in early May.

For now, we have preliminary results, with numbers culled from the U.S. Census, state and county health data and the city’s own community surveys.

The report notes that the 2010 population was 34,399, a five percent decrease from 1990 and 3.7 percent decrease from 2000. The number of households with children has consistently dropped throughout the decades, while the percentage of households below the poverty level has slowly increased.

The report also shows that the 55 to 64 age group has seen the biggest population increase from 2000 to 2010 (about 3 percent), while the 65 to 80 age group declined about 3 percent. The percentage of those 24 years old and younger and residents ages 25 to 34 saw little change, while those 35 to 44 decreased about 2 percent, and 45 to 54 increased about 2 percent.

For sexual orientation, 39 percent of people who responded identified themselves as gay males, 39 percent as heterosexual, 4 percent bisexual, 3 percent lesbian and 11 percent did not respond.

One thing that has not changed in three decades is the percentage of renter-occupied housing units compared to owner-occupied, remaining at 78 and 22 percent, respectively.

And while WeHo’ans like to smoke more than LA County residents on average, we are also well below the county obesity average.

Above, we highlight important study numbers.

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John Mackey
7 years ago

Viva The East Side! Because We Have Municipal Access TV, The Whole Community Is Linked. Having night time council meetings cablecast into most West Hollywood homes is something I strongly promoted during the first election in 1984.

Steve
Steve
7 years ago

I’m so confused by these comments. The argument is that the population of West Hollywood has decreased, yet there is concern that the new buildings won’t house West Hollywood residents. The point of this growth is that people want to move into West Hollywood. No, current east side residents probably won’t move a block or two to these new buildings, but why would they? These will be brand new WEST HOLLYWOOD residents. How did you think the city would grow? Babies being born? These new units will provide residents with a fresh, new voice to West Hollywood, something that has… Read more »

Snarkygal
Snarkygal
7 years ago

I agree Isa. The new high density apartments will not be filled by residents from the east side either. The rents on these new buildings will be to high for most east siders to even consider moving into them. Also the individual units in the new buildings will also be smaller than most apartments on the east side.

Isa
Isa
7 years ago

The many new large apartment buildings that are being built on the far eastern rim of West Hollywood should adjust much of the above stated “problem”. Once again the East Weho gets loaded up with with such high density yet I doubt if any of the new residents will be current residents that will move to the far East WEHO. I do not believe this was a housing issue more than tax based redevelopment.

Snarkygal
Snarkygal
7 years ago

Affordable housing is not low income housing. Many people get that confused. The income required for some “affordable housing” projects is up near $60,000. Do you consider that poor? Also, BC, not all Section 8 tenants are minorities. That is a stereotype. Many are disabled of all races.

The reason the poverty level has increased is because of the economy.

Aging buildings are torn down so condos can be built all across the city, not so affordable housing can built.

BC
BC
7 years ago

The reason the poverty level has increased is in part because this city has a mindset that the poor must be spoon fed, which perpetuates their poverty. Also, as affordable aging buildings are torn down and new “affordable housing” is built and then is filled by tenants from around the entire county who qualify for “affordable housing” (ie poor minorities), the regular working folks who could afford a regular low-priced unit but don’t qualify for “affordable housing” have to move out of Weho and are replaced by whoever is next on the waiting list at the County Housing Authority. Expect… Read more »

Steve
Steve
7 years ago

One reason why population might be down is due to the diminished housing stock West Hollywood currently offers. The 2007 ordinance banning new development put an end to many new quality projects that had been moving through the process. During that time the condition of many units continued to deteriorate with no new units to replace that.

Happily we are looking at an entirely different scenario 6 years later. Hundreds of new quality units will soon arrive bringing 1000’s of new residents.